Lausanne’s Olympic Museum on Korean Time for the 23rd Winter Olympic Games

Musée Olympique de Lausanne

Lausanne, Suisse, 2017

Scenographer : Bunker Palace
Multimedia : Kaa
Photographer : Julien Discrit

We designed the graphic elements of the exhibition “Do you speak PyeongChang?” at the Olympic Museum of Lausanne, Switzerland, in collaboration with scenographers from Bunker Palace.

The exhibition was based on artist performances, fine dining and unique activities such as ski simulators (ski enthusiasts, take note!). Upon arrival, the visitor is welcomed by Soohorang, the Olympic Games mascot, and his Paralympic Games companion, Bandabi.

We worked with materials that are traditionally common in Korea, such as wood and paper. The headings were made of neon light, in contrast to this tradition, and illustrated the modern counterpart. The concept of “HAN” (which means “Korean”) served as a red thread. It is articulated on three pillars: the HANryu (the cultural wave), the HANtech (the hyperconnectivity), the HANgul (the alphabet, invented six hundred years ago). The Korean sign appears in large scale, like a pictogram, throughout the visit.

The concept of “HAN” (which means “Korean”) served as a red thread.

We designed the graphic elements of the exhibition “Do you speak PyeongChang?” at the Olympic Museum of Lausanne, Switzerland, in collaboration with scenographers from Bunker Palace.

The exhibition was based on artist performances, fine dining and unique activities such as ski simulators (ski enthusiasts, take note!). Upon arrival, the visitor is welcomed by Soohorang, the Olympic Games mascot, and his Paralympic Games companion, Bandabi.

We worked with materials that are traditionally common in Korea, such as wood and paper. The headings were made of neon light, in contrast to this tradition, and illustrated the modern counterpart. The concept of “HAN” (which means “Korean”) served as a red thread. It is articulated on three pillars: the HANryu (the cultural wave), the HANtech (the hyperconnectivity), the HANgul (the alphabet, invented six hundred years ago). The Korean sign appears in large scale, like a pictogram, throughout the visit.

The concept of “HAN” (which means “Korean”) served as a red thread.