Communication for the Design Museum’s New Exhibition about Hella Jongerius

Design Museum

London, United Kingdom, 2017

Hella Jongerius has made a name for herself, among other things, as the artistic director responsible for colors and materials at Vitra. In 2017, the Design Museum in London dedicated an exhibition to her and entrusted us with its communication.

The museum asked us to think about a campaign that would appeal to the London public. In the research phase, we presented a lead based on the Stroop test. In psychology, the Stroop effect refers to the interference produced by irrelevant information during the performance of a cognitive task. The test consists of, for example, naming a written color while the text is in another color.

At the first presentation, our proposed marketing approach conflicted with Hella Jongerius’ vision. The works presented in the exhibition were installations around the nuances of color according to the time of day. We then proposed displaying the tumblers that the artist used for her research. In order to be consistent with the catalogue and to facilitate discussions, we suggested to use Helvetica Neue in all communications.

Hella Jongerius has made a name for herself, among other things, as the artistic director responsible for colors and materials at Vitra. In 2017, the Design Museum in London dedicated an exhibition to her and entrusted us with its communication.

The museum asked us to think about a campaign that would appeal to the London public. In the research phase, we presented a lead based on the Stroop test. In psychology, the Stroop effect refers to the interference produced by irrelevant information during the performance of a cognitive task. The test consists of, for example, naming a written color while the text is in another color.

At the first presentation, our proposed marketing approach conflicted with Hella Jongerius’ vision. The works presented in the exhibition were installations around the nuances of color according to the time of day. We then proposed displaying the tumblers that the artist used for her research. In order to be consistent with the catalogue and to facilitate discussions, we suggested to use Helvetica Neue in all communications.