Creating a Signage Family to Guide Visitors Through the Faience Museum

Musée de la Faïence

Nevers, France, 2014

Architect : Benoît Crépet

After ten years of work, the restored and enlarged Faience Museum of Nevers, France, reopened its doors in June 2013. The museum now has 22,604 square foot of exhibition space and a large part of the collections was being presented to the public for the first time.

We won the design and manufacturing contract with Boscher Signage, and came onto the project when it was almost finished: the site was scheduled for acceptance two months later. We decided to integrate ourselves as much as possible into the architectural project, which favored natural materials: stone, wood, and metal.

We used signage for marking as soon as possible. Metal and wood were used for the necessary orientation supports. This choice of materials made it possible to process the exterior and interior signage in the same family of supports, to ensure a conductive thread for the visitor.

We decided to integrate ourselves as much as possible into the architectural project, which favored natural materials: stone, wood, and metal.

After ten years of work, the restored and enlarged Faience Museum of Nevers, France, reopened its doors in June 2013. The museum now has 22,604 square foot of exhibition space and a large part of the collections was being presented to the public for the first time.

We won the design and manufacturing contract with Boscher Signage, and came onto the project when it was almost finished: the site was scheduled for acceptance two months later. We decided to integrate ourselves as much as possible into the architectural project, which favored natural materials: stone, wood, and metal.

We used signage for marking as soon as possible. Metal and wood were used for the necessary orientation supports. This choice of materials made it possible to process the exterior and interior signage in the same family of supports, to ensure a conductive thread for the visitor.

We decided to integrate ourselves as much as possible into the architectural project, which favored natural materials: stone, wood, and metal.