Avoiding Misinterpretations in the Communication for the Tokyo-Paris Exhibition

Musée d'Orsay

Paris, France, 2017

Don’t expect to see Japanese paintings on your way to the Tokyo-Paris exhibition! In 2017, in partnership with the Bridgestone Museum of Art in Tokyo, the Musée de l’Orangerie displayed the Ishibashi industrial dynasty’s art collection, which is largely made up of European works.

The museum wanted to communicate with one of the key masterpieces in the collection, Les Nymphéas by Monet. Concerned about the possible misdirection (people might have thought it was an exhibition on the Impressionists), we proposed to work on the visual of Les Nymphéas in a round frame. The strong image evoked the Japanese flag by being placed on a white background.

Don’t expect to see Japanese paintings on your way to the Tokyo-Paris exhibition! In 2017, in partnership with the Bridgestone Museum of Art in Tokyo, the Musée de l’Orangerie displayed the Ishibashi industrial dynasty’s art collection, which is largely made up of European works.

The museum wanted to communicate with one of the key masterpieces in the collection, Les Nymphéas by Monet. Concerned about the possible misdirection (people might have thought it was an exhibition on the Impressionists), we proposed to work on the visual of Les Nymphéas in a round frame. The strong image evoked the Japanese flag by being placed on a white background.